Lines and Patterns

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It is often recommended by photography experts not to take pictures on sunny days when the sunlight is straight up and cast deep shadows.  Under softer lights, everything looks more balanced and fine details show better.  However, I sometimes don’t just wait around for the right timing. When my shooting bug is disturbing me, I want to shoot regardless the conditions.
I am a big fan of our Creator’s divine design and I also truly believe that God created everything for a reason.  He orchestrated the process and fine tuned his work to perfection. Sunrise and sunset are two prime time to take pictures, but I am determined to explore in bright sunny days, too.

High contrast light is not good for fine details, but it is good for reflected lines and patterns which are also important elements for a good photograph.  I have walked down this street many times and even dined in the boutique restaurant inside, but I have never noticed these lines till I was a bit sweaty under the harsh sun. I was looking for my subject up and down the street. Businesses do not often change their signs and all these trees have been there for hundreds of years. I am sure these lines were there since the railing was built, but it is surely my new discovery.

The brick building above is an old building. I may have glanced at it once when I first came to this area. Today when I was out looking for photography target, I had my second glance and I found the exterior metal window cases and the cast shadows are interesting.  So I snapped the shots.  However, not until I downloaded the picture, I did not pay attention to the brick trim and its pattern on the building. A few twigs comes across the blue sky and symbolically holds on to the building. The brick is structured and the twigs added a natural touch.
We neglected the existence of many things around us until we had that inspirational moment. Once our heart and mind are open, we learned to be more receptive to new things and more observant to our surroundings.
Photography journey is inspiring. To me, it is not just about taking a nice photo, it is a self-discovery, education, observation and enlightenment working progress. I learned to appreciate more, enjoy more and perceive more through the pictures I took.

I am a church goer, but I have not taken any church pictures because most of the church buildings do not look like churches any more.  My ideal church building is in white color, has triangle reef lines, bell tower, and etched glass windows.  Just one day earlier, I drove by this old church in a small town.  This church resembles my ideal church, and is worth a shot.

Sun was not as harsh as the time when I took above two shots, but it was enough to create shadows. I don’t mind the shadow here because it added the depth of the image. And, there are lines (roof’s triangle lines, siding’s horizontal lines) and patterns (the classic window case). I was able to frame the whole structure in with my wide angle lens. I did not use a wide angle lens in the past, but I love to play with it ever since I got it.

Whenever I am driving on the highway, I always enjoyed watching the translucent water lines sprouting from irrigation system. They create lines above vast green field. White water and green grass are contrasting nicely and the fan patterns are beautiful.

They are the combination of metal wheels and water pipes with spraying holes. No tires on the wheels. I guess that helps the stabilization when the water is spraying and the pressure is on. 

As I was plowing through the deserted farm, I found them resting under the scorched sun. The circular lines and criss cross rim patterns drew my attention. The heat in the air seemed to steam the trees behind and generated that hazy layer. The wheels cast shadows on the grass. If not for lines and patterns, I think this picture portraits a hot sunny day.

Too much sun or too much rain, no problem.  We are here for our exploration on earth and we can always find something out of ordinary if we are deemed to be on this photography adventure.

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