Bug me, Please

Wonder how the “Don’t bug me” phrase was started in the first place. On quite a few occasions I really felt the threat of the bugs, but occasionally, like this last week, I hope they come to bug me, to be my photo subject.
The most deadly bug attack I had was at Steens Mountain swamp in Central Oregon. It was our first visit and we were not fully prepared to bug proof. . Small price to pay to enjoy the stunning colors of the swamp, I think. I remember that we had to dash out of the place and run into a general store to get a $7 can of bug repellent.  I still quivered and felt itching all over whenever I thought about it.
I like to shoot birds and natural habitats such as wildlife refugees are full of bugs. From distance, they look like tornadoes. When I had to pass by them, I usually held my breath and walked as fast as I can. It’s like walking past a bug blind. But for the love of shooting birds, I have no problem bearing the nuisance.
On these nice summer days, we like to enjoy our meals on the porch. Just recently got a smoker, and smoking meats become our weekend routine. Bees (I mean, yellow jackets, not honey bees) do not go to the trap anymore, they hang out on our patio table and sniffed our smoked meat without fail. We have a Zapper (like a tennis racket with a metal screen, battery-powered) which works really well, but I don’t enjoy roasting bees while we are having our dinner.
Why did God create so many bugs? To fill in the void space as the universe is so big and plenty of room left? Of course not. I think they are created as the food for many creatures, at least I know my birds live on the seeds and bugs. I have seen hummingbirds attack bugs in the air. On this note, I accept their existence as long as they don’t attack me except that I tend to be the victim of mosquitoes, I think they like Chinese food.
I am not that patient hunter. But when the opportunity comes, I don’t let it go easily either. A pair of butterflies have come back and forth to my yard as freely as they wish. They remind me of a fictional Chinese love story. ‘Romeo’ was sick and died. ‘Juliet’ came to moan and die from overwhelming grief… There were two white butterflies flying out of the tombs just before The End shows on the movie screen…
They are not fancy butterflies, but it is interesting to look at them closely and examine their delicate parts. A butterfly’s antenna is used to detect which plants are producing nectar and males are using them to sense pheromones from females. At the base of the antennas, there is an organ called the Johnston Organ which controls the orientation of the Butterfly.
The most interesting part to me is the proboscis which is like a long nose. Imagine how elephants fetch their food. This proboscis is the channel for the nectar to pass through from the flower to the mouth of the Butterfly.I happened to capture the image on the right when this moth is ready to take in the nectar that it just harvested. The coil and the big eye of the little creature caught my eyes.

People (including me) often think Butterfly is more attractive than Moth. Most of the moths look plain, I agree. They are usually blended in and appeared lost in the background. But God played a little favor and designed a nice robe for them.  Did English kings’ apparel designers were inspired by a little moth to design the robes for the kings? They certainly look the same to me.
Never too late to learn particularly since I have not spent much time on biology as a student. Brisk as a butterfly and quiet as a moth, I say, bug me, I would love to take their pictures.
Exactly what is the difference between a butterfly and a moth? The chart below offered by Encyclopedia Britannia is a good illustration.

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